How Flu Spreads: A Look At The Potency of “Super Spreaders”

How Flu Spreads: A Look At The Potency of “Super Spreaders”
September 26, 2017 0 Comments

It’s almost that time again, flu season.  In fact the CDC’s “Flu View” shows cases based on geographic location nationwide. The map provides an overview of the U.S. virologic surveillance reports based on WHO and NREVSS collaborating laboratories, which include both public health and clinical laboratories located in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia.  The map shows the number of positive influenza tests by virus type and influenza A subtype (H1 or H3) and influenza B lineage.  

In this chart CDC’s laboratories reported over 15,000 cases of influeza subtype A and another 6,500 subtype B for a total of nearly 12,500 cases nationwide in less than a year.

CDC-flu-view-September-2017.png

Why Is Flu Spread So Easily? The Answer: “Super Spreaders”

More people are spreading the influenza virus to others as the number of the cases rise in the US.*

Research has proven that some people spread contagious infections to a multitude of people versus others who only spread disease to a small few. The potency of a Super Spreader is the difference between a local outbreak and a national epidemic.*  Identifying a fever and the onset of illness is the first step to prevent the spread of your infection to other people.

The primary indicator of infection is body temperature.  A fevered person is sick and has 10 to 1,000,000 times more contagion coming from them in breath than someone who is well.  For the purpose of casual contact and airborne illness, a person is not considered to be sick one day before and one day after symptoms of the flu are apparent.  

See How High-Volume Infrared Fever Detection Solution, welloStation Prevents Flu Spread

WelloStation detects fevered persons hands-free, enabling healthcare, education, jail and any high-volume location or business prevent infection spread by detecting fevered persons immediately.

welloStatio-explainer.jpg

 

Want to stay up to date with advances in disease control and wello® news? Subscribe today and don’t miss out.